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Hull material

Posted by Peter Kingston 
Hull material
25 March, 2011 19:34
I came across a boat recently constructed from material called "fibre-reinforced epoxy composite". Not to be confused with GRP, apparently, it is claimed to be almost indistructable, and rot/rust/osmosis proof. Also has high thermal qualities. Is also much lighter than steel. Only negative seems to be the labour intensive construction process of the sandwich construction.

Well, that's the blurb! Anybody have any experience of this material. Sounds too good to be true - which usually means it is:-((

Regards

Peter
Re: Hull material
25 March, 2011 23:11
Quote:
Peter Kingston
I came across a boat recently constructed from material called "fibre-reinforced epoxy composite". Not to be confused with GRP, apparently, it is claimed to be almost indistructable, and rot/rust/osmosis proof. Also has high thermal qualities. Is also much lighter than steel. Only negative seems to be the labour intensive construction process of the sandwich construction.
Well, that's the blurb! Anybody have any experience of this material. Sounds too good to be true - which usually means it is:-((

Regards

Peter

Hi Peter
Many of the larger carbon fiber-reinforced polymer parts are created with a single layer of carbon fabric, and built up with layers of fiberglass. A tool called a chopper gun can be used to quickly create these types of parts. Once a thin shell is created out of carbon fiber, the chopper gun is a pneumatic tool that cuts fiberglass from a roll and sprays resin at the same time, so that the fiberglass and resin are mixed on the spot.

My boat was built similarly in the 70s with layers of long fibered sheets of fiberglass and chopper gunned short fiberglass built up into a sandwich almost 2in thick in parts.

There weren't many boats built like that as it was so expensive and time consuming, but they certainly last well.

AJ
Re: Re: Hull material
26 March, 2011 09:07
Thanks Andy,

That sounds like it. Very handy if it means the boat never needs to be
lifted!

I find that if a boat is used very often all year, and is moored in a
current, hardly any growth sticks to the hull. Now there's a nice
alternative to anti-fouling:-))

Thanks again.

Peter
Re: Hull material
26 March, 2011 18:38
The RNLI Trent & Severn Class Lifeboats were constructed of FRC.

[www.44mlb.com]

I remember watching a crew training video showing someone demonstrating the strength it.

Swinging a full size pick-axe overhead, it took a number of direct blows to even leave a mark !!

All the best...Mark
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